Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Intelligence : multiple perspectives

By: Gardner, Howard, 1943-
Title By: Kornhaber, Mindy L | Wake, Warren K
Material type: BookPublisher: Belmont, CA : Thomson/Wadsworth, c1996.Description: xiii, 351 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 9780030726293Program: EDGX901Subject(s): IntellectDDC classification: 153.9 GA IN
Summary:
No psychological topic is of greater interest to the general public, and to the discipline of psychology as a whole, than intelligence. Laypeople argue at length about who is intelligent, how to become smarter, and what difference IQ makes. Psychologists and other scholars debate the definition of intelligence, the best ways to measure it, and the relation between intelligence and other social virtues, like creativity, or social vices, like criminal behavior. Much controversy has surrounded the study of intelligence, but few would dispute Richard Herrnstein's claim that the study of intelligence has been one of the greatest successes of 20th century psychology.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
    average rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Item type Home library Call number Status Notes Date due Barcode Item holds Course reserves
REGULAR University of Wollongong in Dubai
Main Collection
153.9 GA IN (Browse shelf) Available October2018 T0060496
REGULAR University of Wollongong in Dubai
Main Collection
153.9 GA IN (Browse shelf) Available T0056836

EDGX901 Autumn2021

Total holds: 0

Includes bibliographical references (p. [301]-329) and indexes.

1. Historical and cultural perspectives -- 2. Origins of the scientific perspective -- 3. The psychometric perspective -- 4. The developmental perspective : Piaget and beyond -- 5. Biological perspectives -- 6. The cognitive perspective -- 7. Recent perspectives -- 8. From the perspective of school -- 9. From the perspective of the workplace.

No psychological topic is of greater interest to the general public, and to the discipline of psychology as a whole, than intelligence. Laypeople argue at length about who is intelligent, how to become smarter, and what difference IQ makes. Psychologists and other scholars debate the definition of intelligence, the best ways to measure it, and the relation between intelligence and other social virtues, like creativity, or social vices, like criminal behavior. Much controversy has surrounded the study of intelligence, but few would dispute Richard Herrnstein's claim that the study of intelligence has been one of the greatest successes of 20th century psychology.

EDGX901

Powered by Koha